The Microsoft Excel team was on Reddit yesterday holding an AMA. Users got to grill the team about their biggest Excel pet peeves, beg for long awaited feature requests, and of course, make some good ol’ fashioned Excel puns:

Did you ever wonder why you lose whatever you’ve copied to the clipboard after doing the tiniest thing in any other cell?

Or why CSVs are so annoying to work with?

Or why VBA can’t be ...better.

Read through the thread and all Excel mysteries will be answered! Well, at least some of them. A good amount of the answers were along the lines of “yeah that does suck, post a suggestion on our User Voice page!” (Although if you haven’t checked out the Excel User Voice page, DO. It’s Microsoft Excel’s community site where you can input product suggestions and other users can vote on them. If you create a suggestion or upvote someone else’s, you’ll get notified if/when the Excel team posts on the thread with a product update.)

The Excel team addressed the VBA concern with the following response:

We love VBA, and we plan to keep it around for the foreseeable future. As we add new features to Windows Desktop and Mac versions of Excel (where VBA is supported), we’ll continue to add object model for those features (see http://dev.office.com/blogs/VBA-impr…), so you have programmable access to all of the capabilities of the application.

That said, the VB runtime was built long before today’s cross platform world (on the VB6 platform which the Visual Studio team has talked about on UserVoice – see http://visualstudio.uservoice.com/forums/121579-…), and with the significant investments we’ve made to run Office across multiple platforms, we want to bring all the great scenarios VBA enabled into this new world and we also want to take advantage of the new opportunities this new world creates for our customers. This has caused us to explore new approaches in order to address the new opportunities of a cloud anchored, cross device world (service connectivity, cross-platform authoring and execution, standards-based languages, cloud based deployment/management, and more).

An early stage of this work is the cross-platform JavaScript APIs available to developers in Office 2016, and we are actively working on dramatically extending that API set to be in line with the existing VBA/COM OM. The good news here is that the new APIs will work regardless of the Excel endpoint/device, which will mean that solutions will be much more universal than they are today. Once we’ve broadened the API set, we’ll start working through some of the tooling (a more modern editor than the VBE) and macro recording.

Cheers, Dan [MS]

Pretty interesting. It seems like this means that maybe eventually they’ll build enough integrations so that you can just code your macros in whatever language you want and forget that there was ever even a time you needed to know VBA ::stares off into the distance dreaming of all the possibilities::

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The full AMA is definitely a fun read, and make sure to check out the Excel User Voice site to vote for all those things that have annoyed you for years!